Print ISSN:-2394-2746

Online ISSN:-2394-2754

CODEN : IJOGCS

Current Issue

Year 2019

Volume: 6 , Issue: 4

Article view: 422

Article download: 224

Indian Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Research


Correlational study of birth weight to sonographic measurement of umbilical cord thickness, fetal abdominal and shoulder pad thickness in overt and gestational diabetes mellitus


Full Text PDF Share on Facebook Share on Twitter


Author Details : Keerthi K Kuttan, A N Regi George, Lola Ramachandran*

Volume : 6, Issue : 1, Year : 2019

Article Page : 20-23


Suggest article by email


Abstract

Introduction: Diabetes is the most common medical complication of pregnancy. Ultrasound has a major role antenatally in predicting fetal weight by using subcutaneous tissue thickness. Hence the major complication macrosomia can be tackled ideally.
Materials and Methods: 100 patients found to have diabetes mellitus, were send for antenatal scan between 30 to 35 weeks and umbilical cord thickness (UC), fetal abdominal subcutaneous tissue thickness (ASTT) and subscapular subcutaneous tissue thickness (SSTT) are measured. They were followed up to delivery and the baby birth weight was recorded to correlate with the sonographic measurements.
Results: SSTT and ASTT measurement had statistically significant correlation with birth weight with a ‘p value’ of <0>
Conclusion: Soft tissue thickness specially SSTT and ASTT can be used to predict macrosomia; hence complications due to that can be properly tackled.

Keywords: ASTT, SSTT, Umbilical cord thickness.

Doi : 10.18231/2394-2754.2019.0005

How to cite : Kuttan K K, George A N R, Ramachandran L, Correlational study of birth weight to sonographic measurement of umbilical cord thickness, fetal abdominal and shoulder pad thickness in overt and gestational diabetes mellitus. Indian J Obstet Gynecol Res 2019;6(1):20-23

Copyright © 2019 by author(s) and Indian J Obstet Gynecol Res. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0) (creativecommons.org)